Tag Archives: education

Generation Hackney, opening up the world of work to young people

Picture: Ian Aitken - The studio where Generation Hackney is based

Picture: Ian Aitken – The studio where Generation Hackney is based

By Samuel Hooper

The thirty-year-old founder of Generation Hackney rises eagerly to greet us as we arrive, picking his way forward through the studio he shares with an eclectic mix of social entrepreneurs earnestly tapping away on laptops, sipping coffee or mending bicycles in the corner.

From his hotdesk in Hackney, armed only with a MacBook, a mobile phone and his unshakeable optimism, Richard Hearn is trying to improve the lives of disaffected school-leavers struggling with the transition from education into work. “I left my job [working as a volunteer mentor coordinator for a large charity] in November and just went for it. And this is where I am now,” he explains. Continue reading

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Hackney Pirates, getting kids reading with a swagger

Ship of Adventures

Pic: Jan Weuterisse: The Ship of Adventures provides a fun environment for kids to learn

By Billy Guedalla

Hackney Pirates is an innovative literacy project for children set-up in 2010. After three and a half years and five homes they have finally secured a permanent home. We went along to have a look around their new premises in Dalston, East London, and meet founding director, Catriona Maclay.

Catriona previously taught Citizenship in a secondary school, where she struggled with witnessing so many children fail to reach their potential. However she never lost her belief in education as “an optimistic and positive thing to be involved in”. Continue reading

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Students at St Mungo’s Recovery College find renewed satisfaction in learning

stmungoslogoStudents of the Recovery College often find a renewed satisfaction in learning, especially those affected by serious problems earlier in life, according to Matthew Burstein, the college’s administrator in Southwark, London.

The college is open to everyone; including St Mungo’s clients, volunteers, staff and the general public. By breaking down the barriers between students the college helps liberate those locked into the identity of being homeless and in need. The college is about equality and as long as the students bring a willingness to learn, it provides the rest.

The courses are designed to be educational rather than therapeutic, with the approach to recovery focusing on people’s skills and the future rather than their problems. Speaking with the Big Issue Online Journalists Matthew said: “The students set their own goals and the onus of attending the courses is placed upon them. People start to feel like valuable members of society when they start attending the college. This is because they start to feel like they are working towards achievable goals. This in turn starts to make them feel motivated.”

Some of the students that have attended the college have gone onto attend other institutions of further education and in some cases employment. Matthew says the aim of the college is not to push clients into education and employment, rather enable them to feel empowered enough to set and achieve their own goals. The college allows its clients to take part in any aspect of the college such as tutor, student or volunteer.

By promoting equality and focusing on people’s abilities rather than their problems the Recovery College creates a real sense of community and this is reflected in how previous students often return to St Mungo’s to run courses and workshops, or to share their skills and experiences as a volunteer.

Currently in its second year The Recovery College is funded by St Mungo’s, one of Britain’s largest charities supporting people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness. To find out more about St Mungo’s Recovery College visit their website.

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Week 6 Blog Post

Award ceremony Friday 13th December 2013.

Award ceremony Friday 13th December 2013.

Award ceremony Friday 13th December 2013.

Award ceremony Friday 13th December 2013.

Award ceremony Friday 13th December 2013.

Award ceremony Friday 13th December 2013.

Award ceremony Friday 13th December 2013.

Award ceremony Friday 13th December 2013.

Award ceremony Friday 13th December 2013.

Award ceremony Friday 13th December 2013.

Award ceremony Friday 13th December 2013.

Award ceremony Friday 13th December 2013.

Award ceremony Friday 13th December 2013.

Award ceremony Friday 13th December 2013.

Award ceremony Friday 13th December 2013.

Award ceremony Friday 13th December 2013.

So here I am.  My last day of training with Poached Creative and the Big Issue at the Elise Centre in Dalston. It’s been educational and insightful, two of the many things which has made the whole course enjoyable.

I have gained knowledge in using my Canon Bridge camera to the best of my ability.  And I have every intention of improving this ability with more practice.  There are many aspects of photography such as Photo Essays, lighting, aperture, shuttle speed and much more which has encouraged me to do more research and practice.  I hope that with practice I will be able to produce more great photos.

The journalist side of the training has showed me how news editorials, features, NIB’s and different styles of writing are complied and what the essence of a good story is. Although I am not a good writer, the training has given me much needed confidence which I’m proud of and I’ve started noticing the differing writing styles in newspapers.

Attending the course gave me a routine. Although only 2 days a week it soon became the high-light of my week. I live in NW London and the commute is an hour each-way but that did not deter me. I was determined to be there on time and to be there for all the sessions, although that was not always possible. Being in that “learning” environment was nice as wasn’t all class room.  We went out many times which really added to the fun. And the interactions with others was pleasant. I’ve met and interviewed some interesting people.  This would never have happened in my ‘normal’ life.  I now know that there is so much going on in the community sector. There are many ‘good’ people all around us and much to report.

Overall, the course, its contents, the tutors, the interviews, the venues, the sandwiches from Charles, the coffee, my classmates, the Blogs…. I could go on but am limited to the ‘word count’.  Simply put, it is a very will compiled course which anyone would benefit from. If you are thinking of enrolling then just do it.  It doesn’t cost a penny and the skills learnt are invaluable.

Thank you to ALL the TEAM.  Jessica, Zoe, Charles, Glenn, Grant, Tobias, Kezia and Adele.

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